Jewish weddings are very different to those of the Christian faith in terms of ceremony. It’s advisable where a Jewish couple may have their heart set on a non-faith live band to bring in a wedding planner to formalise the entertainment arrangements.

Halakha – or Jewish law – requires that people celebrate and have fun after a wedding, so exploring the wedding entertainment options is definitely a mitzvah. Jewish couples and their guests don’t have to wait until after the wedding to bring on the fun however.

Late night after wedding party

While the late night after the wedding party is becoming a popular trend, it’s unlikely to catch on with Jewish weddings. These usually take place either late on Saturday night, after sundown, or on a Sunday. So with neither a late start on Saturday night nor an early work day on Monday, the time in between can make for a great time of celebration at the centre of which is the Jewish wedding band. In Jewish custom also, the bride and groom are not supposed to eat before the wedding. So, to have a wedding late enough in the day to make a late night after wedding party possible, you’d have to be willing to be starving!

The tish

However, Jewish couples have the advantage of a built-in pre-party with the tish, as it’s called. Once practised only by Orthodox Jews, the pre-wedding tish is becoming popular again with many Jewish newly-weds. It’s one great party and the tish the perfect time to surprise guests – even the bride or groom – with special entertainment. As Jewish weddings are large family affairs, this can include strolling magicians, clowns, and a singer dedicating that special song to the new pair..

If a tish is not on the cards the wedding celebrations can still make the most of a variety of entertainment options. Getting married on a Sunday opens up various options financially as a Jewish wedding band will be more likely to agree to shorter performance times or even special deals on a day when they aren’t likely to get other bookings.

Jewish wedding band experience

A special dance or musical performance is often considered in addition to the appearance of a Jewish wedding band or a DJ. Fiddler on the Roof-style Jewish Bottle Dancers is a classic example of adding a little bit of flair to the tish or wedding reception. As mentioned, when it comes to hiring a wedding band or DJ, it’s recommended to check with them well beforehand about their experience with Jewish weddings. The rhythm of a Jewish wedding celebration is rather different to that of a Christian one and therefore for the musicians and singers performing as a Jewish wedding band to know something about what’s involved is a must really or it can all get a bit embarrassing.

If you book a live band that hasn’t worked a Jewish wedding before you really should involve a wedding planner with Jewish wedding training. But no matter how much experience your planner or band has, make sure that both you and the organisers are clear about any rules of modesty or observation (kashrut) that you, your rabbi, synagogue, venue, or family members have. There are all sorts of levels of observance and what seems obvious to one person may be a new concept to someone else. For someone outside the Jewish faith of course, it can all be a bit confusing.

Modern Jewish community and SensationBand

Jewish wedding band entertainment is nothing new to the versatile musicians and singers in London’s SensationBand. The SensationBand’s ever popular with the Barmitzvah and Batmitzvahs crowd in the capital, playing all the favourites among the modern Jewish community. The young, fresh look and feel of the band has a huge appeal and SensationBand offers high-energy sets of Jewish Simcha – or joyful – music to really hype up traditional Israeli dancing, so much an important part of Jewish wedding band entertainment.